Another John Jenkins Fail at Notre Dame

Dr. Gerard Bradley, Professor at Notre Dame’s Law School, has taken down Fr. John  Jenkins for failing to exercise the religious freedom now being respected by the federal government under President Trump.  Jenkins apparently likes to cover those birth control pills for Notre Dame staff and students.   He started out by retaining the entire Obamacare birth control policy, but, under pressure, decided to repudiate the morning after pills, while keeping coverage of what he called ‘contraceptives’.   Read Dr. Bradley’s worthy article HERE.

Fr. Jenkins likely has not enough understanding to know which birth control is abortifacient.  This pharmacist suspects that he really doesn’t care.  Just to clarify for everyone who DOES care:

The levonorgestrel morning after pills don’t work very well, and when they do, they can stop the life of an early embryo.  The (anti-progesterone),  ulipristal acetate, morning after pill  also has abortive mechanism.

Progestin only birth control pills, shots and implants are not very effective at suppressing ovulation, so a significant portion of their mechanism operates after fertilization (kills early embryos).  In addition, as the patients who  use these forms of birth control grow in size, (a side effect),  their ability to stop baby production decreases.

All combination birth control pills, with both estrogen and progestin analogs, can sometimes work after fertilization, possibly to impede tubal transport or implantation, thereby killing early embryos.

When Father Jenkins says yes to birth control other than condoms and diaphragms (which are also too artificial for adherent Catholics),  he is involved in stopping human life, not merely preventing it.

The Catholic Church has been shrinking itself in stature and number by saying “never mind” to so many of us who tried to take the Church’s teachings seriously.  I have found so many other Christian denominations catching on to the natural law that Catholics used to teach. Those groups will be growing, while the likes of Fr. Jenkins run faithful Catholics off.

Thanks to Dr. Gerard Bradley for giving a cogent update and analysis of Fr. Jenkin’s latest failure.

Call A Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaambulance: Weld County, CO, Chooses not to Fund Emergency Birth Control

Weld County vote against emergency contraception leaves patients looking elsewhere | The Colorado Independent.

John Tomasic of the Colorado Independent, expresses his sadness (above)  that Weld  County is not providing the morning after pills to its family planning clinics.

The crux of the issue is that the social conservative politicians in Weld County don’t want to spend tax dollars on relatively ineffective birth control drugs, which can often operate through abortive mechanisms.

Tomasic and his ‘expert’  interviewee, Judith Schlay seemed disturbed that the politicians would have learned the multiple mechanisms of morning after pills via the internet.  Tomasic says – go to the New York Times for your medical info, as he does.  Old-timer Schlay says- go to the university library, etc.

Pharmer says that Pubmed is on the internet, and so is the information provided by the drug manufacturers to their regulatory boards.  Schlay needs to update herself on the myriad sources of medical information.  She might increase her depth of knowledge on the pharmacology of levonorgestrel and ulipristal acetate.

One thing we know for certain- It’s a giant, tax payer funded cash cow to be pounding expensive morning after pills into women, mostly during times when they couldn’t get pregnant even without the pill.  More abortions can be sold if women come to rely on these birth control methods which demonstrate  less than 60% reduction in pregnancy rate,  in actual use.   It’s not hard to find ‘reproductive health care experts’ who want to line their pockets with tax money.

(Another) Pharmacist Refuses to Sell Morning After Pill to a Man

Quite a significant number of pharmacists prefer to sell the morning after pills only to the actual patient.  If you search the net, you’ll find a fair number of stories detailing this phenomenon.

Apparently a recent story has made the news and has a bit of buzz on the blogs. Seems that “Hilary and Jon” had a desire for the morning after pill. They’re not yet married, and apparently not ready to have a baby. Jon was surprised to encounter a female pharmacist who would not sell the drug to him.

Some people have no idea why a pharmacist, who is willing to sell those pills, would make that decision. The girls at Reality Check seem to fall into this group.  So Pharmer made an attempt to explain this to them, and added a bit of extra bonus information.

1) Many formerly over the counter remedies have been placed in restricted access due to abuse.  All cold remedies containing pseudoephedrine are now behind the pharmacist’s counter, and sales are restricted,  because people like to use that chemical to produce methamphetamine.

2) The morning after pills are sometimes abused by males, who give them to females without their consent, sometimes as a chaser to “date rape” drugs.  Because of this, it makes sense to restrict the sale of the morning after pills to men.  Congratulations to the pharmacist who had enough sense to understand  this, and take a stand to protect women.

3)  It is misbranding to refer to a drug as “contraception” if it does not significantly stop or delay ovulation during or after the luteal peak (during the most fertile time of the month).  Part of its action is due to mechanisms operating after fertilization.   The morning after pills are properly classed as “hormonal birth control”, not “contraception”.

4) The morning after pills have shown MUCH less  effectiveness than was initially claimed.  It makes NO sense for a woman to change sexual behavior due to reliance on the morning after pills.  They reduce pregnancy rates by about 60 percent, or LESS.

5) In general, the effect of marketing ulipristal acetate, and levonorgestrel as morning-after-pills will be to stem the decline of the abortion rate.   The spectre of increasingly abysmal medical care, overlaid by ever increasing drug shortages has possibly  killed the mood for a lot of women, leading to a dip in abortion demand in the U.S.  Heavily marketing a poorer quality birth control option might be enough to keep the abortion businesses alive.  Levonorgestrel MAP was strongly associated with that effect in Anna Glasier’s Scottish studies.

Pharmer finds the morning after pills to be problematic on a number of levels, ranging from ethics to efficacy, and doesn’t dispense them at all.

Caution to People Who Rejoice over 2009 CDC Abortion Data

New CDC data shows bungled abortion reporting in 2009.

Everyone is all abuzz over the 5% reduction in abortions shown in the 2009 CDC data. Instead they should be digging a bit deeper to see if the data really represents reality. Some pro-lifers target the reporters who expected an increase in abortions due to the economy. It’s true that poverty for women rose in 2009 and continues to do so.

The CDC is only able to count reported abortions, and therefore the data is necessarily incomplete. State laws requiring abortion reporting to a central agency vary from non-existent to un-enforceable.

The opportunity to induce home abortions and have them completed at hospitals has increased. These events cannot be reported as abortions unless the mom admits to doing something illegal, or accuses someone else of doing something illegal to her. Internet commerce has made home abortion chemistry much more accessible than in the past. Therefore it is unlikely that any numbers reported by the CDC are available. More recently Ulipristal acetate (Ella) has become available with online prescribing, providing a newer home abortion option using accumulated doses.

It should be noted that even without the above consideration, the CDC data on surgical plus mifepristone abortion is not comprehensive.

So far the joyful articles reporting the CDC abortion data of 2009 did not mention the LIMITATIONS section of the report, part of which is quoted below. Note that the CDC only reports 65 -69% of the abortions which are reported by the Alan Guttmacher Institute. Read on:

“The findings in this report are subject to at least four limitations. First, because reporting requirements are established by the individual reporting areas (17), the collection of data varies, and CDC is unable to obtain the total number of abortions performed in the United States. During the period covered by this report, the total annual number of abortions recorded by CDC was 65%–69% of the number recorded by the Guttmacher Institute (12,59), which uses numerous active follow-up techniques to increase the completeness of the data obtained through its periodic national census of abortion providers (12). Although most reporting areas collect and send abortion data to CDC, this information is given to CDC voluntarily. Consequently, during 2000–2009, seven of the 52 reporting areas did not provide CDC data on a consistent annual basis, and for 2009, CDC did not obtain any information from California, Delaware, Maryland, or New Hampshire.***** In addition, whereas most of the reporting areas that send abortion data to CDC have laws requiring medical providers to submit a report for every abortion they perform to a central health agency, in New Jersey and the District of Columbia, medical providers submit this information voluntarily (16). As a result, the abortion numbers these areas report to CDC are incomplete.††††† Moreover, even in states that legally require medical providers to submit a report for all the abortions they perform, enforcement of this requirement varies (60). Consequently, several other reporting areas tend to provide CDC with incomplete numbers.”

http://www.homeabortion.info/index.html

The Reason for FDA Approval of Ella, Ulipristal Acetate is HERE

RU—Serious? Jennie McCormack, the Next “Roe”? Good Grief | LifeNews.com.

Jennie McCormack aborted her 5 month unborn baby using mifepristone and misoprostil which she purchased online.
She was charged for illegally obtaining those drugs, doing a home abortion, and violating the ban on abortions after 20 weeks. She is appealing her convictions with the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.

The FDA approved Ella for use as a morning after pill in an effort to provide another avenue for procurement of drugs for home abortions. Ella, ulipristal acetate, is a chemical analog of RU-456, mifepristone, and, in sufficient doses, operates by the same mechanism. Ella can be obtained from an online pharmacy in Utah, and doing so would circumvent one of the laws which McCormack has broken in her home state of Idaho.

‘I can’t give you the morning-after pill… it’s against my religion’ – Local – Hartlepool Mail

‘I can’t give you the morning-after pill… it’s against my religion’ – Local – Hartlepool Mail.

Another conscientious Boots Pharmacist acts up.   A 29 year old female patient, who desired to remain anonymous, was refused the morning after pill at a Boots pharmacy in Middleton Grange Shopping Centre, Hartlepool, UK.

She left the pharmacy in a state of shock, and was apparently  not able to get her pills until two days later.

Boots pharmacies has dealt with this issue before, and their spokesman acknowledges that the employees have a right to exercise conscientious objection, in refusing to dispense certain drugs.

The above linked article fails to recognize the manufacturer’s  stated multiple mechanisms of the morning after pills, and dishonestly states only  that they operate  to “stop the ovaries from releasing eggs”.

 

AZ court upholds limits on abortion

AZ court upholds limits on abortion.

Jivin J over at Jill Stanek’s found this news, of an  Arizona appeals court upholding that state’s new abortion limitations.

Nurse practitioners are no longer allowed to do the mifepristone abortions.  Waiting periods remain in place, and pharmacists right of conscience is upheld with respect to other abortive drugs: the morning after pills.

This is a BIG deal, as the criterion of  “undue burden” for women is defined more stringently.  The fact that the law allows some burden on those seeking abortion is not sufficient for the law to be overturned.

*Note:  Mifepristone, RU-486,  is dispensed by the prescriber or his agent, not pharmacists.  However the chemical analog, ulipristal acetate, or Ella, a morning after pill, is able to be dispensed by pharmacists.

Let Abortionist James Pendergraft Show you WHY the FDA Approved Ella, Ulipristal Acetate.

Unlicensed abortionist operating secret ‘lethal injection’ abortion facility in DC: watchdog group | LifeSiteNews.com.

Abortionist James S Pendergraft injected toxic doses of meds into the hearts of fetuses in utero, and told their moms to finish up the job at a legitimate hospital, or other facility.  This way the abortion would be counted as a fetal demise, miscarraige, etc., and the mom would avoid the abortion stigma as well as much of the cost.

Ella, (ulipristal acetate) was put on to the market as a morning after pill, but the abortionists will be doing a similar thing with this drug, using it off label, and in increased doses, to cause fetal demise.

It’s another abortion pill, but without the regulatory controls applied to mifepristone,  ru486, it’s chemical analog.

For the time being,  Pendergraft is in hot water for practicing with a suspended license in Washington DC.

FDA remembers the old days, when it used to do its job.

Dr. Gerard M. Nadal appropriately nails the non-functional FDA to the wall, noting it’s new Kelsey award, honoring a former FDA reviewer from back when the agency was worth something.

Frances O. Kelsey, now 96 years old, is the namesake and first recipient of the Kelsey award from the FDA for doing what she was supposed to do. She stopped distribution of Thalidomide, for morning sickness, in the USA, likely sparing countless kids the associated birth defect called phocomelia, severely shortened limbs.

Nadal notes that the present FDA commissioner, Margaret Hamburg has ushered in the new drug Ella, ulipristal acetate, without appropriate testing, and with next to zero study of its effects on the babies who survive its embryocidal effects. In addition, the FDA has misbranded this drug as a contraceptive, thus disrespecting female patients’ right of informed consent to treatment.

Ella, The Morning After Pill, Ulipristal Acetate, AUDIO

Listen up, if you prefer an audible opportunity to learn about Ulipristal Acetate, the new morning after pill.
Roland Lettner host of KFUO’s Studio One, interviews the Pharmer following the FDA approval of this drug for use in the United States.

You’ll get an EARFUL right here during the last 30 minutes of the show recorded on 8-19-10
(An interview with Michelle Malkin occupies the first 30 min.)