Leftie Media: An Unreliable Source Regarding Medical Events

The tale of  Salon contributor  Mikki Kendall  getting an abortion to save her life serves as an example.

She relates a late term (20 weeks) gestational hemorrhage  (possibly from placenta abruptio, detachment of the placenta) and postulates  that an abortion was needed to save her life.

The trouble is that neither this nor other causes of late term  gestational bleeding  are  addressed with  abortion procedures.  If the bleeding cannot be stopped,  an emergency delivery, usually  by C-section, is done, and frequently  the baby is lost due to prematurity, or complications stemming from the condition of the mother.

The patient admits to being incompetent to sign permission for surgery,  due to her medical condition.   Her memory of events also appears to be significantly impaired.

Another important note  is that  hospital records and discourse  utilize the term “abortion” for any end to a pregnancy which involves the baby’s demise prior to birth.   This includes  natural causes,  result of injury or disease, and purposely  induced abortions.  This is possibly what has led to the notion that a surgical abortion procedure was involved in this case.

If accuracy in describing Kendall’s  treatment was desired,  medical records could have been utilized  in order to correctly relate what had occurred in her treatment.

Instead,  the procedure is described simply as an abortion, and utilized by Salon for the political purpose of  generating a feeling of need for  induced  abortions.

This hospital pharmacist can attest that it is quite possible to enter an emergency room which does not have a physician present who can manage late term gestational bleeding.  In that case, a physician who can handle the situation is called in.   Normally a physician arriving late in the evening under emergent conditions is not accompanied  by  her own “cadre of students“.

This particular Salon story serves mainly as  a means to propagandize the wonders of  induced abortion to those who don’t  know how  late term gestational bleeding  is  properly managed.

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4 comments

  1. The patient says that the doctor who was present refused to handle the gestational bleeding on the grounds that he does not perform abortions, not on the grounds that he was unable to manage the bleeding. It sounds like the doctor was the one lumping everything described medically as "abortion" together here?

    • The patient reports herself as not competent to sign the release to do surgery.
      Refer back to the fact that abortion is a catch all term for fetal demise prior to birth, whether it is induced or not.
      The records indicating when the decision was made to deliver the baby, and why, have not been referenced. Not all gestational bleeding (even of significant quantities) ends in loss of the baby.
      The description of this event is very much filled with emotion, and not medically precise.
      From incomplete and imprecise information, the conclusion that "abortion" procedures are needed to save the lives of mothers is being touted.
      Abortion procedures are not the methods of choice for addressing late term gestational bleeding.

  2. She was not competent because she had lost so much blood she was in danger of losing consciousness and then her life. I have a news flash for you. People who act like things always go like the rule book says aren't fit to be commenting on anything more complicated than, "Would you like fries with that?" Your misrepresentation of her story and her ordeal indicates deficiencies in both character and knowledge. Anyone who can read that account and come up with this deceitful summing up is so unscrupulous as to wonder at the thought processes which produce such conclusions.

    • It appears that ginmar did not fully understand the content of the post, which comments upon an incomplete and medically implausible story, that lacks internal consistency as well as consistency with the original version blogged a few years back.
      Ginmar and pharmer agree on one point, the lack of competency of the patient to remember the event accurately.